Monthly Archives: December 2010

Walkthrough: Create custom SharePoint 2010 list form for deployment in a Visual Studio 2010 project

(This is part 1 of 2. See link below.)

Today I want to show you how to create a custom list form for deployment within a custom list template developed in Visual Studio 2010.

Download or update or modify my demo code on Codeplex.com:
http://spcustomlistformdemo.codeplex.com/

For me I was difficult to figure out this way. I could not find a good documentation about this topic so I’ll write ist Smile – If you found another description please post a link in the comments below. Thanks!

1. Create a Site Collection in your SharePoint 2010. Mine is called “http://sharepoint.local/sites/listform”

2. In Visual Studio 2010 create an empty SharePoint 2010 project.

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Choose “Deploy as farm solution!”

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3. Add new item to you project: “List Definition” with type “Custom list” and with “Add a list instance”

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4. Deploy this project “as is”.

5. Have a look in your browser:

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6. Open SharePoint Designer 2010 (SPD) and open the site “http://sharepoint.local/sites/listform”. Open the deployed list “SPCustomListFormDemo – ListInstance1”

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7. In the SPD in the List Settings of “SPCustomListFormDemo – ListInstance1” click the Ribbon tab “List Settings”. Then click “List Form”. You get this dialog:

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Enter the name of the new list form, e.g. “new2.aspx”.

8. In SPD in the List Settings in the “Forms” view you can see your newly created list form.

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Select it and open it for edit.

Click “Advanced Mode” in the Ribbon !!!

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Select all the content of the new2.aspx file.

Copy the HTML code.

Open NOTEPAD and paste the HTML code.

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9. Go into your project in Visual Studio 2010. There add a new project item of type “Application Page”.  Name it “new2.aspx”.

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The page will be created in folder “LayoutsSPCustomListFormDemo”

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With “drag & drop” Move the new2.aspx note to your List Definition:

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Remove the “Layouts” folder. You get:

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Select “new2.aspx” in the Solution Explorer and change its property “DeploymentType” to “ElementFile”

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10. In VS2010 open “new2.aspx” for edit. Delete all content of the file except this two lines:

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Replace the “DynamicMasterPageFile” attribute name through “MasterPageFile”. You get:

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11. Got to NOTEPAD. Remove the “Page” tag as marked in the screenshow:

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Select the rest of the file and copy it to the clipboard.

Now remove the complete content of the “ZoneTemplate” node. – Do not remove the “ZoneTemplate” node itself. Now the specific part of “new2.aspx” looks like this:

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(There is a “DataFormWebPart” included in the “ZoneTemplate” node. This you remove by following the last step from above. But at runtime SharePoint will create a new DataFormWebPart in the Web Part Zone with ID “Main”. That’s the reason why we need to remove the copied and pasted Web Parts: It’s one of such a DataFormWebPart too much on the site after SharePoint creates the new one on runtime…)

12. In VS2010 paste the code into “new2.aspx”

13. Open “new2.aspx.cs” from the Solution Explorer:

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Insert this “using”:

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Replace the base type of your class definition from “LayoutsPageBase” to “WebPartPage”.

14. In the Solution Explorer open “schema.xml” of your list definition:

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Scroll to the bottom of the file and find this part of XML code:

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Replace the “SetupPath” attribute of the Form node with type “NewForm” with this value:

features$SharePoint.Feature.DeploymentPath$ListDefinition1new2.aspx

You get:

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15. Deploy your solution.

16. Go into the browser, reload the list and “add new item”.

Now your custom list form will be used!

The URL in the Browser is identically to the first try! Why is it “NewForm.aspx” and not “new2.aspx”?

-> SharePoint uses “NewForm.aspx” as page for “Add new item” but internally redirects to the defined “New Form” of the list.

You can add some code for demo purpose to help you identifying your custom list form. For that reason I inserted

<h1>Hello World</h1>

into the the ASP Content PlaceHolder “PlaceHolderMain”:

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The final result:

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  Now you can do your own staff on your custom list form.

In Part Two I want to show you how to use you own form input fields instead using the at runtime inserted DataFormWebPart Web Part. …


It’s done: Part 2: https://blog.kenaro.com/2011/01/24/walkthrough-create-custom-sharepoint-2010-list-form-for-deployment-in-a-visual-studio-2010-project-part-2/

CodePlex project uploaded: SharePoint 2010 Conditional Lookup Control

I’ve created a custom control for SharePoint 2010. This control let you connect two lookup fields so that the second lookup field contains only a subset of all values depending on the selected value of the first lookup field.

The control can handle both rendering methods of SharePoint for lookup fields: If there are more then 20 items in a lookup dropdown it will be rendered alternatively as input text box and not as input dropdown…

But… It’s alpha!!!

See: http://spconditionallookup.codeplex.com

Some Screenshots…

This is the demo list where you start using the demo.

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Add a new item. You see two input controls. Both are empty.

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Now you open the dropdown list of the first field:

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There are values in Winking smile – Leave it on “(none)” for now.

Open the dropdown of the second field:

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Its empty Smile

Now select the value “List1-Value1” in the first dropdown.

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Now open the second dropdown. Now there are values in there Smile :

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The second dropdown was filled with values depending on the selected value of the first dropdown.

Lets have a look behind the scene.

Open the List “This list defines the value dependencies between the main list and the conditional list”:

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This list defines the values for the second dropdown depending on the values of the first dropdown.

For value “List1-Value1” you’ll find there 4 values:

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Lets have a look into the project:

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The Test project has 4 SharePoint List definitions… “List 1” is the “main list” and “List 3” is the “conditional list”. “List 2” will contain the items you create. “RefList” contains the dependencies between “List 1” and “List 3”.

“List 2” contains to custom list forms:

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“New2” is used to create new items, “Edit2” is used to edit items.

Lets have a look into “New2”. There are only a few customizations for using the Conditional Lookup control.

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This references to the input fields “ff1” and “ff2”:

1:                             <tr> 
2:                                 <td> 
3:                                     <table  border="0"  cellspacing="0"  width="100%"> 
4:                                         <tr> 
5:                                             <td  width="190px"  valign="top"  class="ms-formlabel"> 
6:                                                 <h3  class="ms-standardheader"> 
7:                                                     <nobr> Reference (lookup) to the main list </nobr> 
8:                                                 </h3> 
9:                                             </td> 
10:                                             <td  width="400px"  valign="top"  class="ms-formbody"> 
11:                                                 <SharePoint:FormField  runat="server"  ID="ff1"  ControlMode="New"  FieldName="List2RefToList1FieldA"  /> 
12:                                                 <SharePoint:FieldDescription  runat="server"  ID="ff1description"  FieldName="List2RefToList1FieldA" 
13:                                                     ControlMode="New"  /> 
14:                                             </td> 
15:                                         </tr> 
16:                                         <tr> 
17:                                             <td  width="190px"  valign="top"  class="ms-formlabel"> 
18:                                                 <h3  class="ms-standardheader"> 
19:                                                     <nobr> Reference (lookup) to the conditional list</nobr> 
20:                                                 </h3> 
21:                                             </td> 
22:                                             <td  width="400px"  valign="top"  class="ms-formbody"> 
23:                                                 <SharePoint:FormField  runat="server"  ID="ff2"  ControlMode="New"  FieldName="List2RefToList3FieldA"/> 
24:                                                 <SharePoint:FieldDescription  runat="server"  ID="ff2description"  FieldName="List2RefToList3FieldA" 
25:                                                     ControlMode="New"  /> 
26:                                             </td> 
27:                                         </tr> 
28:                                         <tr  id="idAttachmentsRow"> 
29:                                             <td  nowrap="true"  valign="top"  class="ms-formlabel"  width="20%"> 
30:                                                 <SharePoint:FieldLabel  ControlMode="New"  FieldName="Attachments"  runat="server"  /> 
31:                                             </td> 
32:                                             <td  valign="top"  class="ms-formbody"  width="80%"> 
33:                                                 <SharePoint:FormField   runat="server"  ID="AttachmentsField"  ControlMode="New"  FieldName="Attachments"/> 
34:                                             </td> 
35:                                         </tr> 
36:                                     </table> 
37:                                 </td> 
38:                             </tr> 
39: 
40: 

Read and write User Profile Properties of SharePoint 2010 User Profile Service Application with PowerShell

I needed to change some properties of user profiles of my SharePoint 2010 farm.

Of cource I wanted to do this with PowerShell!

Before you can execute the following script, be sure that your user account is “Admin” on your “User Profile Service Application” and has “Full Control” permissions on the same Service App! – You may get this error: New-Object : Exception calling ".ctor" with "1" argument(s): "No User Profile Application available to service the request. Contact your farm administrator." – You can verify or change this settings in the Central Administration –> Manage Service Applications –> (select User Profile Service Application) –> than:

  1. Click “Administrators” –> Add the user that will execute the PowerShell script –> Set “Full Control” for this user –> Click “OK”
  2. Click “Permissions” –> Add the user that will execute the PowerShell script –> Set “Full Control” for this user –> Click “OK”

So…

Here is the Script for reading properties from the profile system:

#region Check x64 host
if( [System.IntPtr]::Size -ne 8) {
  Write-Error "Please use a x64 PowerShell host!"
  return
}
#endregion

#region Load SharePoint SnapIn and DLL
  Remove-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
  Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
  
  [System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.SharePoint") | out-null    
  
  #Check available SharePoint Cmdlets
  if( (Get-Command -Noun SPWeb*) -eq $null ) {
    Write-Error "SharePoint SnapIn not loaded. SharePoint cmdlets missing!"
    return
  }
#endregion

#User must be set as Full Control *Admin* and with Full Control *Permission* on Central Admin->Manager Service Application->User Profiler Service App!!

$site=(Get-SPSite "http://sharepoint.local")
$sc = [Microsoft.Office.Server.ServerContext]::GetContext($site)

$upm = New-Object "Microsoft.Office.Server.UserProfiles.UserProfileManager" -ArgumentList ($sc)
$enumerator = $upm.GetEnumerator()
$enumerator.Reset()
while( $enumerator.MoveNext() -eq $true ) {
  $currentUserProfile = $enumerator.Current
  $propertiesCollection = $currentUserProfile.ProfileManager.PropertiesWithSection
  if( $currentUserProfile -ne $null -and $propertiesCollection -ne $null ) {
    foreach($p in $propertiesCollection) {
      Write-Output $p.Name $currentUserProfile[$p.Name].Value
    }
    
    #write to a property:
    #$currentUserProfile["FirstName"].Value="Test"
    #$currentUserProfile.Commit()
  }
}

If you need to write property values than uncomment the two lines on the bottom of the script and change them.

BE VERY CAREFULLY!!!!

You can damage your profile system if you do things wrong! – Be sure that your script will only change one property for one user. If you uncomment the script lines above this script would set the property “FirstName”  of every user  to value “Test”!!! – BE VERY, VERY CAREFULLY!!!

Create tool for Visual Studio 2010 to extract the full qualified public assemby name with PowerShell

I created a simple tool extension for Visual Studio for extracting the full qualified name of an .NET assembly.

Like this: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee539398.aspx but without a compiled application.

I used PowerShell for this.

HERE ARE THE STEPS:

    1. Got to Visual Studio 2010
    2. Open Menu “Tools”
    3. Open Dialog “External Tools”
    4. Click “Add” to add a new tool entry
    5. Specify “Full Assembly Name” as “Title”
    6. Enter “c:windowssystem32WindowsPowerShellv1.0powershell.exe” as “Command”
    7. Enter
      -command "&{[System.Reflection.AssemblyName]::GetAssemblyName('$(TargetPath)').FullName}"

      as “Arguments”

    8. Check “Use output window”
    9. Click “OK”
    10. You can use this tool if your output binary can be compiled(!)

Screenshots:

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Walkthrough: Create Form with InfoPath and use it in a SharePoint 2010 Form Library

In this walkthrough I want to show you the steps for creating a InfoPath form and use it with InfoPath Forms Services of SharePoint 2010.

1. First I downloaded a downloadable InfoPath form from Microsoft: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/new-travel-client-preference-form-TC001201306.aspx – It’s called “New travel client preference form”.

2. I create a document library where I store my InfoPath template(s).

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3. Open InfoPath Designer. Open the downloaded InfoPath form (see step 1).

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4. Go to “File” menu.

=> Click “Publish your form”

=> On the first time you will be redirected to “Publish” sub menu.

=> On “Publish” menu: Click “Quick Publish” or “SharePoint Server”

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A wizard starts…

On the first page enter the URL of the destination site.

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On the second page I choose “Site Content Type”. => So you can use the form on multiple lists.

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Create new Content Type.

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Enter the name of the Content Type.

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Specify the location where the form template will be saved. This URL will be used for the Content Type. You know: A Content Type can have a document template setting that is used to create new items (documents) based on this Content Type. The URL will be stored in the Content Type.

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Add all form columns to the resulting Content Type. This columns will be available in the SharePoint list items that represent a saved form. (Here I choose some columns for this example…)

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Now you are almost finished. – Click “Publish”…

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That’s the result for that:

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4. Go to the browser. Open your SharePoint site.

=> Click “Libraries” in the Quick Launch.

=> Create a new Form Library like this:

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Click “Library Settings” in the Ribbon.

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Edit the “Advanced Settings” of the library.

=> Select the option “Allow management of content types?” May be other options. Then save.

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Now edit the Content Types of the library on the “Library Settings” page:

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=> Press “Add from existing site content types”.

Now choose your previously created content type “TravelPreference”. Then press “OK”.

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Optional: Remove the standard “Form” content type from the list.

Now it looks like this:

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5. In InfoPath Designer

=> Open the “File” menu.

=> Open the “Info” sub menu.

=> Click “Submit Options”

Choose “To SharePoint Library”

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In the wizard: Specify the location for saving the filled forms:

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Go through the next wizard page… Click “Finish”

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=> Open the “File” menu.

=> Open the “Info” sub menu.

=> Click “Form Options”

Open “Compatibility” tab. Choose Form Type “Web Browser Form” and enter the site URL:

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Click OK.

The “Design Checker” will open. There are some problems in the form:

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This results in setting the form type to “Web Browser Form”: Such a form does not have some features. – Now remove the fields from the form…

Click “Refresh” in the “Design Checker” pane.

Now there’s only a warning. You can ignore this.

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=> Open the “File” menu.

=> Open the “Info” sub menu.

Click “Quick Publish”

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That’s it:

image

 

6. Go to the browser. Open your SharePoint site. Open your “TravelPreferences” list.

=> Click “Add new document”

NOW YOU’LL GET YOUR BROWSER FORM!!!

Fill it out!

Click “Submit” (NOT: “Save” => You can disable the “Save” button in InfoPath Designer => “File” menu => “Info” pane => “Advanced form options” => “Web Browser” tab)

After clicking “Submit” you’ll get a document in your form library:

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This can be used with Workflows and any other SharePoint functionality…

Error while enabling Session State Service on SharePoint 2010

There are some mysterios errors on my SharePoint farm. After reading tons of log files I found some hints to problems with the “Session State Service” of SharePoint 2010.

I found this Cmdlets in PowerShell for controlling this service:

Enable-SPSessionStateService 
Disable-SPSessionStateService
Get-SPSessionStateService
Set-SPSessionStateService

I tried to enable the service with the first Cmdlet. – This was the resulting error:

image

Error message: “Microsoft SharePoint Server session state could not find the Session State Service. Contact your farm administrator.”

There is no information about this error in the internet. (Till now Smile )

MY SOLUTION FOR MY PROBLEM (may be it does not help you in your special situation. It’s “experimental”!!!):

I created a PowerShell script for re-creating the Session State Service and its Service Application.

Before you go on: Make sure, the Windows service “ASP.NET State Service” is running. (I set it to start automatically during system startup.)

This is the resulting script:

#region Check x64 host
    if( [System.IntPtr]::Size -ne 8) {
      Write-Error "Please use a x64 PowerShell host!"
      return
    }
#endregion

#region Load SharePoint SnapIn and DLL
  Remove-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
  Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
  
  #Check available SharePoint Cmdlets
  if( (Get-Command -Noun SPWeb*) -eq $null ) {
    Write-Error "SharePoint SnapIn not loaded. SharePoint cmdlets missing!"
    return
  }
#endregion

cls

$farm = [Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPFarm]::Local

$services = $farm.get_Services() #get all SharePoint services
$sessionStateService = ($services | ? { $_.TypeName -like "*session state*" } ) #find the existing Session State Service -> it was "NULL" for me!

if( $sessionStateService -eq $null ) {
    #Recreate the Service
    $newSessionStateService = New-Object Microsoft.Office.Server.Administration.SessionStateService ("", $farm)
    $newSessionStateService.Id = [System.Guid]::NewGuid()
    $newSessionStateService.Name=[String]::Empty
    $newSessionStateService.Update()
    $farm.Update()
    $newSessionStateService.Provision()
    $newSessionStateService.Name=[String]::Empty
    $newSessionStateService.Update()
}

$services = $farm.get_Services() 
$sessionStateService = ($services | ? { $_.TypeName -like "*session state*" } ) 

$servers=(Get-SPServer)

#Create service instances on all application servers of the SharePoint farm
$servers | % {
    if( $_.Role -eq "Application" ) {
      $currentSessionStateSvcOnServer = ($_.ServiceInstances | ? { $_.TypeName -like "*session state*" } ) 
      if( $currentSessionStateSvcOnServer -eq $null ) {
        #write-host $_.Name $server.Role $_.gettype().fullname
        
        #To create a service instance you must use a "protected" constructor
        [type]$t = "Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPServiceInstance" -as "Type"
        $p = @( ("string" -as [Type]), ("Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPServer" -as [Type]), 
                ("Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPService" -as [Type]) )
        $c = $t.GetConstructor([System.Reflection.BindingFlags]::NonPublic -bor [System.Reflection.BindingFlags]::Instance,$null, $p, $null)
        #these are the parameters for creating a service instance by using the protected constructor
        [Object[]]$params = @([Object]"Session State Service Instance", 
                              [Object]([Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPFarm]::Local.Servers[$_.Name]), 
                              [Object]([Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPFarm]::Local.Services[$sessionStateService.Id]))
        $newSvcInstance = $c.Invoke($params)
        #update & provisioning
        $newSvcInstance.Update()
        $newSvcInstance.Provision()
      }
    }
}

if( (Get-SPSessionStateService -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue) -ne $null ) {
  Write-Host "Successfull :-)" -ForegroundColor Green
} else {
  Write-Host "Failed :-(" -ForegroundColor Red
}

After that, the “Enable-SPSessionStateService” works:

image

(Spend me 1 1/2 days.)


You can use this script to delete the Session State Service, e.g. if some script parts does not work as expected. ONCE MORE: USE IT CAREFULLY AND AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!

#region Check x64 host
    if( [System.IntPtr]::Size -ne 8) {
      Write-Error "Please use a x64 PowerShell host!"
      return
    }
#endregion

#region Load SharePoint SnapIn and DLL
  Remove-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
  Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
  
  #Check available SharePoint Cmdlets
  if( (Get-Command -Noun SPWeb*) -eq $null ) {
    Write-Error "SharePoint SnapIn not loaded. SharePoint cmdlets missing!"
    return
  }
#endregion

cls

$farm = [Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPFarm]::Local

Get-SPServiceApplication | ? {$_.GetType().FullName -eq "Microsoft.Office.Server.Administration.SessionStateServiceApplication"} | Remove-SPServiceApplication 

$farm.Services | ? { $_.TypeName -like "*session state*" } | % {
  $_.Instances | % {
    $_.Delete()
  }
  $_.Delete()
}

Enumerate Sharepoint 2010 database in PowerShell

“Is there a way to enumerate all SharePoint 2010 databases in PowerShell like the page /_admin/DatabaseStatus.aspx”>/_admin/DatabaseStatus.aspx”>http://<centra_administration>/_admin/DatabaseStatus.aspx does it??”

YES!

You can use this script:

[System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.SharePoint") 

$farm = [Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPFarm]::Local

$type = ('Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPPersistedTypeCollection`1') -as "Type"
$type = $type.MakeGenericType( ("Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPDatabase"as "Type") )
$o = [Activator]::CreateInstance($type, $farm)

$’

Now the variable “o” contains all Database-Objects of your farm!

How to create an instance of an generic class in PowerShell

Sometimes you may need to create instances of generic classes in PowerShell.

Like this (in C#):

 using  System;

 using  System.Text;
 
 namespace  tmp1
 {
     class  Program 
     {
         static  void  Main(string [] args)
         {
             System.Collections.Generic.List<string> t = new  System.Collections.Generic.List<string>();
         }
     }
 }

There is a generic class used in the code above: System.Collection.Generic.List.

If you want to create an instance of this class in PowerShell you can not use this:

New-Object "System.Collections.Generic.List<string>"

You’ll receive an error!

Here is the solution: You can use the System.Type that represents other .NET types.

Use this PowerShell code snipped to create an instance of System.Collections.Generic.List<string>

$type = ("System.Collections.Generic.List"+'`'+"1") -as "Type"
$type = $type.MakeGenericType("system.string" -as "Type")
$o = [Activator]::CreateInstance($type)

“$o” will contain the created instance.

You can use this method for all other generic classes.

You may need to change the following details.

  1. In the first line of the snipped there is `+"1" This is the amount of parameters for the generic class.
  2. In the second line you have to specify the parameter types for the generic class. Separate them with “,” and cast them to System.Type by using -as “Type”.
  3. In the third line you may need to specify the constructor parameters for creating an instance of the generic class.

Here is another example:

$type = ("System.Collections.Generic.SortedList"+'`'+"2") -as "Type"
$type = $type.MakeGenericType( @( ("System.Int32" -as "Type"), ("system.string" -as "Type") ) )
$o = [Activator]::CreateInstance($type, 100)
$o.Add(1, "test")
$o

This creates an instance of System.Collections.Generic.SortedList<System.Int32, String> with a starting capacity of 10 (line 3: the second parameter of CreateInstance).

How to determine current PowerShell session is x86 or x64.

For the execution of SharePoint PowerShell scripts I need to check the execution environment of my PowerShell session to be sure that PowerShell runs as x64 application.

This was a problem because PowerShell does not provide this information itself.

BUT PowerShell is a .NET Application.

There you can check for x86 or x64 by using this static method (in C# or VB.NET):

System.IntPtr.Size

In PowerShell syntax:

[System.IntPtr]::Size

This results in “4” for x86 and “8” for x64. (Without question marks of cource. The result type is int.)

So you can use this in your PowerShell script.

Here I started 2 PowerShell sessions: one x86 and one x64. See the result of the command above:

image

(In the window title you see “Windows PowerShell (x86)” –> That’s the x86 session. The x64 session has no special window title.)

Here is a corresponding PowerShell code snipped:

#region Check x64 host
if( [System.IntPtr]::Size -ne 8) {
  Write-Error "Please use a x64 PowerShell host!"
  return
}
#endregion

Forefront Protection 2010 for SharePoint–Error “The SharePoint service is running but the Forefront VSAPI Library is not registered”

 

I got this error in the config tool of Forefront Protection 2010 for SharePoint:

“The SharePoint service is running but the Forefront VSAPI Library is not registered”

image

Here is what I did:

1. Stop running service “Microsoft Forefront Server Protection Controller”

2. Stop running service “Microsoft Forefront Server Protection Controller for SharePoint”

3. Go to your installation directory of Forefront Protection 2010 for SharePoint

4. Run from command prompt: “fsccontroller.exe /disable”

5. Run from command prompt: “fsccontroller.exe /enable”

6. Restart SharePoint Services:

    • SharePoint 2010 Administration
    • SharePoint 2010 Timer

7. Start service “Microsoft Forefront Server Protection Controller for SharePoint”

8. Start service “Microsoft Forefront Server Protection Controller”

9. That’s it. (Do a “Refresh” in the Forefront management console application.)

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